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Here’s a list of gun control laws passed since the Parkland shooting

Here’s a list of gun control laws passed since the Parkland shooting
[Photo: Flickr user Fibonacci Blue]

Thursday marks the first anniversary of the deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, where 17 students and school employees were killed. Since then, a number of gun control laws have been passed across the country, mostly at the state level. The following laws are among them:

  • Florida passed the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Act in the wake of the shooting. It raised the age to purchase guns to 21 from 18, banned people legally judged “mentally defective” from buying a gun, and set up a system for law enforcement to take guns from people deemed a threat to themselves or others. The law also banned bump stocks, used in the 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas. Bump stocks make semi-automatic weapons function like automatic guns so that they fire without the need to repeatedly press the trigger.
  • The federal government later effectively banned bump stocks nationwide, with a regulation signed by acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker requiring most gun owners to destroy or turn in the devices by March 26.
  • Washington State voters approved Initiative 1639 in the November 2018 elections. As the Seattle Times reported, the new law requires anyone buying a semi-automatic rifle to be 21, pass a beefed-up background check, have taken a mandatory training class, and wait 10 business days to get the gun. It also allows gun owners to be charged with “community endangerment” if guns are not locked up and a child or someone not allowed to have them commits a crime with them or brandishes them in public.
  • Vermont enacted new laws limiting gun sales to people under 21, capping gun magazine sizes, and restricting person-to-person gun transfers without background checks.
  • New Jersey passed a series of gun legislation banning armor-piercing ammunition, limiting magazine sizes to 10 rounds, allowing guns to be temporarily seized if the owner is deemed dangerous, requiring background checks for private gun sales, and funding a gun violence research center at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.
  • California passed laws banning people convicted of domestic violence and people put on involuntary court psychiatric holds twice in a year from owning guns. The state also now requires that gun buyers be 21. Finally, it mandated training before people could receive concealed-carry permits.
  • Louisiana created a mechanism to seize guns from domestic abusers who are banned from having them. The state also allowed guns up to the property lines of schools and colleges, removed a training requirement before bringing guns into houses of worship, and legalized switchblades.
  • New York earlier this year passed a series of new gun laws, restricting guns in schools (including effectively banning teachers from carrying weapons on the job), providing funding for local gun buy-back programs, and allowing court orders that ban at-risk people from having guns. It also allowed longer waiting periods after inconclusive pre-purchase background checks.
  • In total, 11 states passed laws in 2018 that restrict gun access to people linked to domestic violence, and eight states, plus the District of Columbia, created ways to temporarily keep guns from dangerous or “at risk” people, according to data from the Giffords Law Center, a gun control advocacy group.
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