advertisement
advertisement

The founders of Philadelphia International Records look back at 50 years of Philly Soul

This Black Music Appreciation Month, Fast Company’s KC Ifeanyi spoke with Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff—the innovative founders of Philadelphia International Records. As Gamble and Huff celebrate the 50th anniversary of PIR, the two explain the importance of their label and how they created that signature Philly Soul sound. KC also caught up with Dr. Mark Anthony Neal, professor of African and African American Studies at Duke University, and Philly legend DJ Jazzy Jeff on how PIR has impacted their lives and careers.
advertisement
Video

A Moral Revolution in Business with Anthony Kwame Appiah

Anthony Kwame Appiah is a professor of philosophy at New York University, author of several books, including the “Honor Code,” and writer of the weekly “Ethicist” column in The New York Times Magazine. In this episode of the New Human Movement, Gary Hamel and Michele Zanini talk to Anthony about the moral case for dignity, opportunity and equity in the workplace. This conversation is part of the New Human Movement, a series featuring bold thinkers and radical doers who are reimagining work, management and capitalism for a new age. For more, visit humanocracy.com/movement

A Moral Revolution in Business with Anthony Kwame Appiah
Video

Redesigning the workplace with Lynda Gratton

Lynda Gratton is a professor at the London Business School and one of the world’s leading experts on the future of work. In her latest book, Redesigning Work, Lynda argues that the pandemic has created a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to reimagine the workplace. In this episode of the New Human Movement, Gary Hamel and Michele Zanini talk to Lynda about how we can take advantage of this opening and create organizations that are truly flexible, agile, and human. This conversation is part of the New Human Movement, a series featuring bold thinkers and radical doers who are reimagining work, management and capitalism for a new age. For more, visit humanocracy.com/movement

Redesigning the workplace with Lynda Gratton
Video

Dove teaches teens about toxic influence with deepfakes

Dove offers up a deepfake peek into why many young people need to detox their social media feeds. This week, Dove released new research from its ongoing Self-Esteem Project that found two out of three American girls are spending more than an hour each day on social media, and 50% of them say idealized beauty content on social media causes low self-esteem. Dove produced the short video, “Toxic Influence,” which brings together mothers and their teen daughters to talk about what their scrolling habits involve. This is Fast Company’s Brand Hit or Miss of the Week.

Dove teaches teens about toxic influence with deepfakes
advertisement
advertisement