Dan Macsai

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Fast Company Magazine

San Francisco: Open-Source Government [Fast Cities 2010]

It’s a good thing Gavin Newsom checks his Twitter feed during meetings. Otherwise, San Francisco’s mayor would’ve missed a life-changing missive about … potholes? “It really made me wonder,” he says. “What if we used social media to make our city services work better?” That stray tweet led to the city’s first-of-its-kind Twitter account (@SF311), which encourages residents to send queries and messages about nonemergency issues. But it also underscores the city’s open-source stance on government.

San Francisco: Open-Source Government [Fast Cities 2010]
Fast Company Magazine

Savannah: Renaissance Neighborhoods [Fast Cities 2010]

During the ’90s and aughts, many of Savannah’s poorest neighborhoods spiraled into disrepair. Aging residents lacked the money and energy to maintain their properties; younger residents and business owners were fleeing in search of livelier communities. Fed up with rising crime and plummeting property values, residents staged protests. “They needed help,” says Martin Fretty, who oversees Savannah’s Department of Housing, “and they needed it soon.” In response, the city launched Neighborhood Renaissance Savannah in 2000.

Savannah: Renaissance Neighborhoods [Fast Cities 2010]
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