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The Olympics Bluetooth Strategy

Advertising at sporting events is big business. And for the Olympics, it has to be extraordinary. It has to be innovative. In that regard, Pioco, a Shanghai-based Bluetooth media enterprise, has launched a new advertising campaign for the sporting event that its developers are calling, "the first of its kind." Through the company’s technology wired at thousands of hotspots in and around Olympic stadiums, hotels, restaurants, clubs and cafes, Coca-Cola commercials are being brought to Bluetooth-enabled cell phones.

Advertising at sporting events is big business. And for the Olympics, it has to be extraordinary. It has to be innovative. In that regard, Pioco, a Shanghai-based Bluetooth media enterprise, has launched a new advertising campaign for the sporting event that its developers are calling, “the first of its kind.” Through the company’s technology wired at thousands of hotspots in and around Olympic stadiums, hotels, restaurants, clubs and cafes, Coca-Cola commercials are being brought to Bluetooth-enabled cell phones.

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Pioco first partnered with the Atlanta-based beverage behemoth in its digital marketing efforts two years ago, and has been assisting China’s digital team with ideas for the Olympic Games. Using BlueAiring broadcasting systems, the company can send advertising directly to millions of mobile phone users across the globe, Overall, it took almost a year and a half before developers were finally able to utilize a large network of Bluetooth hotspots around the Olympic stadiums to deliver “something rather simple, the Coca-Cola commercials, in order to reach out to mobile users and to create maximum impact for the on-the-go user experience,” says Steve Chao, CEO of Pioco.

Users with a Bluetooth-enabled phone will receive video within several seconds. (Click here to see an example.) Typical transfer rates range from a low 40 KB to a high 135 KB per second, depending on the phone model. “We believe that the current technological developments in wireless communication can be effectively utilized to enter the currently unexploited and rapidly expanding mobile market,” Chao says.

The company plans to expand to additional global events, starting with the upcoming World Expo in Shanghai in 2010. Chao hopes Pioco will be involved with the Olympics again in 2012 in London, with further innovations and integrations of a global positioning system (GPS, which transmits data through microwave signals) or Near Field Communication (which enables exchanging data between devices over four inches apart) with Bluetooth products “to achieve maximum involvement from the public.”

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