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5 signs you should stay at a job rather than resign

Here are some legitimate reasons to pass on joining the Great Resignation.

5 signs you should stay at a job rather than resign
[Photo: Rawpixel]

After the pandemic, the world of work changed. While in some ways work changed for the better, it didn’t stop the Great Resignation. Between 2020 and 2022, record numbers of professionals quit the workplace and sought better work arrangements either with different employers or independently.

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While it might be tempting to follow your peers and go searching for better-looking opportunities, here are five reasons why staying in your current job can actually pay off.

1. You could run into promotion opportunities

Staying in your current job doesn’t mean you won’t be able to evolve professionally. As workers leave your organization, there will be increased numbers of promotion opportunities available. With fewer colleagues to compete with, you could snap up a promotion and fill a senior role in your organization much quicker than you could externally. You can end up with better pay and more responsibilities, with zero risk taken.

Plus, companies are still more likely to hire internally than seek out new talent, especially during periods of instability. Staying put during this period of disruption proves to your employer that you’re dependable and trustworthy, making promotion within your organization more likely than it was before.

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2. You could move to a new team or project

If you don’t want to quit your job but do want to advance up the career ladder, you can use this opportunity to move to a new team or project. With desks being emptied and workplaces being forced to reorganize, it’s the ideal moment to propose a department switch or ask to move to another team or project.

This is the perfect time to make an internal career change, as your employer will likely be grateful that you stuck around. This means they’ll be more likely to approve a request to switch departments or go work on a more senior project. They might even appreciate your initiative, and you could end up with a pay raise or extra benefits.

3. You could take on new responsibilities

Remaining in your current job doesn’t necessarily mean that you’ll be stuck doing the same work forever. With a smaller team, your boss is now more likely to enlist you to help with other teams and other projects going forward, and you should jump at the opportunity to take on more senior work if you want to progress. This gives you the chance to pick up new skills, work with new colleagues, and make yourself more valuable internally and on the job market.

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If you’re making a bigger impact at work and picking up valuable new skills, this can make you indispensable, and therefore make it easier for you to go for promotions and even ask for a pay raise in your current role–or help you to boost your résumé or your CV if you decide to move on and hit the job market in the future.

4. Some of your least favorite colleagues have moved on

Many professionals cite difficult colleagues as the main reason they find their workplace to be “toxic.” So, mass flight from offices might not always be a bad thing. With difficult colleagues elsewhere, you might begin to enjoy your job a lot more and have a better time in the office.

When confrontational colleagues are no longer present, you might find it easier to speak up and be heard during meetings. You might also be more willing to involve yourself in the social side of things, which will help you get to know your remaining colleagues better.

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When you’re working in a healthy workplace, you’ll get more out of your job, and your employer will get more out of you.

5. Your opinion has become more important

Now that you’re working in a smaller team, your opinion is naturally going to carry more weight. Not only will it be easier to be heard, but also if you have new ideas or want to offer suggestions, you’re far more likely to get them approved when working in reduced numbers.

Whether you want to give input on projects, contribute more to staff meetings, or offer suggestions that you’ve wanted to talk about for years, now is the best time to bring them up.

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Plus, you can leverage your loyalty when suggesting productive changes to the workplace. If your boss thinks you’re going to quit, they’re more likely to listen to your ideas to retain you.

So, if you’re getting itchy feet during the Great Resignation and wondering if you’re missing out on all of the seemingly amazing opportunities that your ex-colleagues seem to be snapping up, just remember that the grass isn’t always greener on the other side. Sure, it’s important to keep your options open and always endeavor to get the best deal for yourself. But don’t ship out without doing your research and assessing all the options available with your current employer, especially if they have treated you well over the past few years.

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