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86% of immigrants still have a positive view of the United States

A new survey from Western Union reveals a remarkable level of optimism among immigrants across six countries, including the United States.

86% of immigrants still have a positive view of the United States
[Source Images: Gregory Adams/Getty]

According to a new survey from Western Union, migrants are extremely optimistic about their economic and social prospects in their new countries. Western Union surveyed 8,000 residents about their backgrounds, present situations, and futures across six countries: France, Germany, Japan, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, and the United States. 

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The findings were significant: Immigrants report incredible optimism about their new homes, with 86% of U.S. migrant respondents saying they viewed their country positively. Across the board, migrants reported greater levels of optimism and success than their native-born counterparts. In the United States, 95% of migrants agreed that they could do well if they worked hard. 

In every country, immigrants reported that the No. 1 reason for emigrating to the new country was better job prospects, followed by higher income (all but France) and education and training (No. 2 reason in France). Across all six countries surveyed, a majority of migrants in every category said they were able to reach the following in their new country: access to education, good job opportunities, access to quality healthcare, and a higher income. 

The survey also breaks down a litany of preconceptions about which demographic groups often fall into, from ethnic categories to socioeconomic statuses. In France, for instance, roughly the same proportion of migrant respondents fell into income categories of below 20,000 euros a year (22%) and above 50,000 euros a year (21%). The survey reaffirms that migrants come from a variety of educational, economic, ethnic, and geographic backgrounds, and a majority of them report that they are better off than they were when growing up.

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