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Floyd’s new $195 rug is the affordable, eco-friendly rug you’ve been waiting for

Affordable, high-quality rugs are nearly impossible to find. Floyd’s new wool and cotton rug might just be the solution.

Floyd’s new $195 rug is the affordable, eco-friendly rug you’ve been waiting for
[Photo: Floyd]
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When I moved three years ago, the hardest purchase for my home was not the couch, the kitchen table, nor even the wall paint. It was our rugs. Rugs are hard. You have to pin down the color and pattern that will complement your decor. You have to check the sizing. And then you have to do that gut check: What can you afford? And do you really want a polyester rug that off-gases formaldehyde into your home?

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[Photo: Floyd]
The bare-bones furniture company Floyd is here to help with a new product called, rather directly, the Rug. Starting at $195, the Rug is a floor covering made from natural materials, 60% wool and 40% cotton. Each rug is woven in two tones, including a heather contrasted with black, anthracite on gray, a dark on light green, an orange on green, and a blue on blue.

[Photo: Floyd]
Floyd’s rug is nothing flashy or particularly novel by design. But it’s meant to fill a hole in the market. High-quality, affordable rugs are difficult to find for all sorts of reasons, ranging from third-party markups to questions of ethical production.

Floyd has specialized in timeless, essential pieces since first launching with a kit of table legs on Kickstarter in 2014. Along the way, it has raised $25 million over two rounds of funding. Floyd has expanded its scope in tandem, building an increasingly strategic and encompassing home furniture brand, one piece at a time.

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[Photo: Floyd]
But producing a woven rug was still new territory for Floyd that required the company to learn new skills. “Most of our products historically have been in hard good furniture—like a bed frame in steel and wood. Upholstery is something we’ve gone deep on for four to five years, but it’s so different than weaving a rug,” says Kyle Hoff, cofounder and CEO of Floyd. “We did have to spend a lot of time working with partners, learning from people who’ve done this for decades.”

[Photo: Floyd]
The company ultimately teamed up with a New Zealand wool producer to source material and a rug producer in India to weave the product. This marks the first time that Floyd has opted not to make a product in the United States, but source internationally. “We’re launching products across the whole home, and some regions of the world are better at producing certain things,” says Hoff, tacitly alluding to India’s long-standing history of rug production. “We’re not making something in the U.S. just because. You want to find the best partners to produce it.” Even still, that position is a marked shift for Floyd, which has closely associated its brand ethos and value with U.S. production.

[Photo: Floyd]
Because the Rug is predominantly wool (Floyd opted against synthetics primarily due to concerns of durability, though there’s a lot of concern of these materials off-gassing harmful chemicals too), the company spent a lot of time standing barefoot on samples to ensure it was soft and fluffy rather than flat and scratchy. Sourcing the right wool is just one component in that challenge, along with the weave, the amount of cotton, and various ways you can treat the wool itself during production. “We want something that people feel good about lying on the floor on and sitting on for a long time,” Hoff says. “We test it like we want to live with it.”

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As for the other tricky part of buying a rug—the sizing—Floyd made these decisions, not on feel or gut, but based upon market research. The Rug will be available in five sizes ranging from 2′ x 8′ ($195) to 8′ 6″ x 11′ 6″ ($995). That means the Rug can accommodate all but the largest living rooms. For those, you’ll just have to find “a rug,” I guess, rather than “the Rug.”

About the author

Mark Wilson is a senior writer at Fast Company who has written about design, technology, and culture for almost 15 years. His work has appeared at Gizmodo, Kotaku, PopMech, PopSci, Esquire, American Photo and Lucky Peach

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