advertisement
advertisement

Ikea recalls 159,000 dishes for scalding users

Ikea is recalling two sets of its plastic dinnerware. It’s not the first time its products have harmed consumers.

Ikea recalls 159,000 dishes for scalding users
[Photos: Ikea]

With picnic season around the corner, many people have picked up plastic dinnerware from Ikea to bring to the beach or the park. It turns out, it may not be safe to use.

advertisement

The Swedish home giant has recalled 159,000 Heroisk and Talrika bowls, plates, and mugs in the United States and Canada. (Recalls were announced in other countries as well, but the full extent of the global recall was not clear.) According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Ikea received 123 reports of these products breaking, causing hot food or liquid to leak out. There were four reports of injuries, two of which required medical attention. Ikea did not respond to a request for more information on how these products malfunctioned.

[Photo: Ikea]
These aren’t the first Ikea products that have been found to harm consumers. As we’ve reported in the past, the company has recalled millions of products because they’ve injured or killed users. Last year, it recalled its plastic Troligtvis travel mug in most markets after tests showed that a version of the mug made in India leached harmful chemicals into the liquid inside it. In 2018, it recalled water-dispensing pet bowls after two dogs suffocated to death when their heads were trapped inside the domelike reservoir that held the water.

[Photo: Ikea]
But perhaps most disturbingly, at least six children have died after furniture toppled over on them, including an incident in 2017 when a Hemnes dresser crushed a 2-year-old to death. Ikea recalled 29 million dressers—eight million Malm dressers and 21 million other models—because of this. In 2015, Ikea launched a “Secure It” campaign, to educate customers about how to secure their furniture to the wall or floor, to prevent it from toppling over on kids.

advertisement

According to Ikea’s website, the Talrika line is made from a more sustainable form of plastic called polylactic acid, which is renewable and plant-based. The Heroisk line is also described as being made from renewable plastic. Ikea said it was recalling these products as a precautionary measure. “All our products are tested and comply with applicable standards and legislation,” the company said in an online statement. “Despite this we have received reports of the products breaking.”

Ikea says customers can return the products to stores for a full refund, even without a receipt.

advertisement
advertisement
advertisement

About the author

Elizabeth Segran, Ph.D., is a senior staff writer at Fast Company. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts

More