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Users went from loving to hating Twitter’s reduced image crops in 24 hours. Because it’s Twitter

“Open for surprise” tweets make up the collateral damage from Twitter’s latest changes. And some users aren’t happy.

Users went from loving to hating Twitter’s reduced image crops in 24 hours. Because it’s Twitter
[Photo: Twitter]
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I know it’s shocking to hear, but people are dissatisfied on Twitter—and they’re letting everyone on the service know it. This latest round of dissatisfaction isn’t about the state of the world or politicians or anything of the like—it’s about Twitter itself. Or, specifically, a change Twitter introduced last night that many users had been asking for for years.

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Last night the company announced that it was finally expanding the crop of images users on iPhones and Android devices see in their feed. This crop traditionally cut off a significant portion of an image a user posted in a tweet, meaning Twitter users had to stop scrolling and tap the image in order to see most of what was in it.

With the new reduced crop change, users can now keep scrolling through their feed without having to stop and tap to see an image in all its full glory. And as you would expect, at first Twitter users loved this.

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However, by the morning after, the tone on Twitter changed. Many were now dissatisfied with Twitter’s crop changes because it ruined a specific type of tweet many on the platform enjoyed: the “open for surprise” tweet.

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The “open for surprise” tweet relied on Twitter’s aggressive cropping of photos. This aggressive cropping meant you couldn’t see the main (sometimes funny or shocking) subject of a photo until you tapped to open it fully. For example:

But now that Twitter’s reduced image crop shows a majority of the photo without the need to tap to expand it, the era of “open for surprise” tweets are over (at least on mobile—but Twitter says reduced crops will soon come to the web as well). And that doesn’t sit well with many Twitter users.

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If there’s a lesson to be learned here, it’s that you can’t please everyone on Twitter, which means Twitter, the company, can never fully win no matter what changes or improvements it decides to implement.

About the author

Michael Grothaus is a novelist, journalist, and former screenwriter. His debut novel EPIPHANY JONES is out now from Orenda Books. You can read more about him at MichaelGrothaus.com

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