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Monochromatic, minimalist home goods that Fast Company loves

Monochrome objects that marry form and functionality.

Monochromatic, minimalist home goods that Fast Company loves
[Photo: Akira Kawahata]
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Monochrome Marvel

The slick and minimalist new Xbox Series S marries form and functionality.

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Microsoft’s new consoles are designed to fade into the background of even the best-decorated homes. The monochromatic Series S, the cheaper of two new models released in September, is visually quiet, though never boring. Its simple shape recalls the legendary mid-century work of industrial designer Dieter Rams at Braun. The box’s surprise hero is utilitarian venting in high-contrast black, creating a video-game console that is as impressive aesthetically as it is technologically. ($300, Xbox.com)

[Photo: Akira Kawahata]

Mesh Magic

These sleek steel bowls from Fundamental Berlin can hold knickknacks or snacks. Fitted with a cork ball, the bowl can also be flipped and used as a lampshade, leaving a stunning geometric light pattern on any wall. ($55, Comingsoonnewyork.com)

[Photo: Akira Kawahata]

Blades of Glory

France’s Tarrerias-Bonjean has been making knives since 1648. The company’s four-piece, black stainless-steel set contains a chef’s knife and santoku blade (pictured above), as well as paring and kitchen knives—and comes with a lifetime guarantee. ($569.95, hammacher.com)

[Photo: Akira Kawahata]

An Iconic Blanket

Susan Kare’s cotton blankets feature the first emoji typeface, Cairo, which she designed in 1984 while working at Apple. Some of the symbols, such as the cursor and watch, live on in operating systems today. ($135, areaware.com)