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Blue Senate watch: 4 ways to track the key races as Democrats fight to flip it

Democrats have a chance to take control of the U.S. Senate. Here are a few ways to track the election results.

Blue Senate watch: 4 ways to track the key races as Democrats fight to flip it
[Photo: Caleb Perez/Unsplash]
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As Americans across the country bite their nails, wait for election results, and finally fall asleep in front of the TV, some key Senate races could be called before they wake up. Or the results may take longer. With so many people voting early this year, it’s hard to say how long it will take to count the ballots.

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In the meantime, Democrats have a chance to take control of the U.S. Senate if things go their way. But that will probably only happen if they can win in a few key races where they are competitive.

First, some math: There are currently 53 Republicans in the Senate versus 47 Democrats. To turn the Senate blue, Democrats would need to pick up four seats. Or they could do it with three seats if Joe Biden and Kamala Harris become president and vice president, because VPs cast tie-breaking Senate votes.

As we edge toward midnight on Tuesday, the first two projected flips have not moved the needle. In Colorado, former Democratic Governor John Hickenlooper is projected to beat incumbent Republican Senator Cory Gardner, while in Alabama, Republican Tommy Tuberville is expected to beat Democratic Senator Doug Jones. If those projections hold up, we’re one to one, so it’s definitely a nail-biter.

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If you’re looking to track the U.S. Senate election results live, we’ve rounded up a few reliable sites with compelling infographics below.

Or if you want to wait until morning, we won’t blame you!

About the author

Christopher Zara is a senior staff news editor for Fast Company and obsessed with media, technology, business, culture, and theater. Before coming to FastCo News, he was a deputy editor at International Business Times, a theater critic for Newsweek, and managing editor of Show Business magazine

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