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‘Expand the court’ becomes a Twitter rallying cry after Amy Coney Barrett’s SCOTUS confirmation

The fact of the matter is, the U.S. constitution is on the side of the ‘expand the court’ calls.

‘Expand the court’ becomes a Twitter rallying cry after Amy Coney Barrett’s SCOTUS confirmation
U.S. President Donald Trump (center right) watches as Supreme Court Associate Justice Clarence Thomas (right) swears in Amy Coney Barrett (left) as a U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice, flanked by her husband Jesse M. Barrett (center left), during a ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House October 26, 2020, in Washington, D.C. [Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images]
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Within hours of Senate Republicans forcing through the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court while voting in the 2020 presidential election has already begun, Twitter was overtaken with calls to “expand the court.”

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The calls urge the Democrats, should they win the White House and the Senate next week, to add additional justices to the Supreme Court in order to combat the Republicans’ actions of forcing through their pick of Amy Coney Barrett to fill the seat left empty by Ruth Bader Ginsberg just days before Election Day—this after Republicans blocked President Obama’s SCOTUS pick for months before the 2016 election.

The fact of the matter is, the U.S. constitution is on the side of the “expand the court” calls. The constitution doesn’t specify the U.S. Supreme Court has to be nine justices—indeed, there have been fewer than nine and more than nine at other points in America’s history.

And calls to “expand the court” are only growing louder. Simply doing a search for the phrase on Twitter will reveal the number of everyday Americans, as well as law experts and journalists, calling for expansion. And then there are others calling for SCOTUS expansion—including politicians, and even Donald Trump’s own niece.

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