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Half of women who work in tech do this surprising thing by age 35

Many women in technology jobs leave the industry by their mid-thirties. That can be traced, in part, to an inclusivity problem.

Half of women who work in tech do this surprising thing by age 35
[Photo: fauxels/Pexels]
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Fifty percent of women in tech leave by age 35, according to a new study.

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That one-out-of-two breakdown can be traced, in part, to an inclusivity problem, the research by Accenture and Girls Who Code reveals. Thirty-seven percent cite it as their primary reason for saying “so long” to the industry.

The percentages get worse for women of color and lesbian, bisexual, and transgender women. Only a bit more than two-thirds of WOC “see a clear pathway from studying tech, engineering, or math to a related career,” the Resetting Tech Culture study finds.

Human resources workers polled are 45% more likely to say it’s “easy for women to thrive in tech”—versus 21% of the women actually in the field.

The survey identifies several ways to help keep 1.4 million young women in tech in the next decade: support parental leave policies, set diversity goals, create women-only supports, reward creativity and innovation, and promote inclusive networking.

“Making it so organizations have the people they need to grow, and women have the opportunities they want to succeed, is a winning strategy for companies and for the strength of the economy at large. Let’s make sure women . . . are ready to thrive in what will inevitably be an even more tech-driven future. And let’s make sure the U.S. is a global tech leader that harnesses all of its rich talent, not just half of it,” the research concludes.

The survey of 1,990 tech workers, 500 high-ranking human resources executives, and 2,700 college students was conducted online between February and July 2019.