advertisement
advertisement

What’s happening with the USPS? Here’s the deal with its shakeup before the surge of mail-in ballots

Democrats said the changes threaten the timely delivery of “medicines for seniors, paychecks for workers, and absentee ballots for voters.”

What’s happening with the USPS? Here’s the deal with its shakeup before the surge of mail-in ballots
[Photo: Tareq Ismail/Unsplash]

The United States Postal Service has just announced sweeping changes to its leadership ahead of the 2020 elections, reports Business Insider. These changes will see a major reorganization of executives at the service and, direly, could mean delays of medicine deliveries for seniors, paychecks for workers, and mail-in ballots for voters, top Democrats have warned.

advertisement

The changes were announced Friday by Postmaster General Louis DeJoy and radically alter the leadership structure of the USPS. The reorganization will see 23 major executives at the postal service resign or displaced, including, as Business Insider points out, two execs who oversee critical day-to-day operations.

DeJoy, who The Washington Post calls a “major ally” of President Trump, said the move will allow the postal service to reduce costs and “capture new revenue.” However, critics point out that the USPS isn’t a for-profit business–its a service to the American people. And then there’s the impact from the resulting leadership changes, which Democrats fear could have dire consequences for workers, seniors, and voters.

“We believe these changes, made during the middle of a once-in-a-century pandemic, now threaten the timely delivery of mail — including medicines for seniors, paychecks for workers, and absentee ballots for voters,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer said in a letter sent to DeJoy.

If the changes make the USPS more inefficient, which critics worry it will, it could mean mail-in voting could be delayed–which could affect the outcome of the election this fall. Earlier this year, DeJoy took other steps under the guise of cost-cutting measures, including prohibiting overtime, which critics fear will weaken the USPS’s ability to deal with the surge in mail-in voting expected for November’s upcoming elections.

To check out the new leadership roster of the USPS after the shakeup, take a look at the service’s organizational chart here.

advertisement
advertisement