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How Jasmine Jordan is elevating women’s sneakerhead culture

The daughter of the GOAT is making her mark on the Jordan brand.

How Jasmine Jordan is elevating women’s sneakerhead culture
Jasmine Jordan [Photo: courtesy of the subject]

Jasmine Jordan isn’t just like Mike, but she is ridiculously close by way of DNA.

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Jordan—in case the surname doesn’t ring a bell—is the daughter of the one Michael Jordan. She understands that her relationship to the GOAT is a big deal, so she’s putting in extra work toward becoming a major player in sports and streetwear culture in her own right, as part of the next generation of the Jordan Brand.

The newly engaged toddler mom always knew she’d be involved in sports in some way but quickly figured out that basketball wasn’t it. After obtaining a degree in sports marketing from Syracuse University in 2014, she embarked on her career journey by doing a couple of internships in sports, before eventually becoming the coordinator of basketball operations for the Charlotte Hornets. She was there for a few years before moving on to the Jordan Brand, where she started as a field rep in 2017 and worked her way to executive status.

Jasmine Jordan [Photo: courtesy of the subject]
“When I first got on board, I still was like, ‘Okay, I’m here, but I need to put in that extra work because I know the target’s going to be on my back.’ It’s my father’s team, I’m a black female. And at that time I was the second and only female in my department of basketball operations,” says Jordan. “I knew the weight was going to be on me, and the expectations were going to be there, so I had to make sure that no matter what, I worked for it and that no one could say it was handed to me. So I appreciate my father making me jump through those hoops because at the end of the day, it makes me appreciate the roles that I’ve had thus far from Hornets and now being with Jordan Brand.”

These days, Jordan has a full workload as a sports marketing executive for the Jordan Brand, where she strategizes how brand visibility meets culture but also gets to indulge in her own love of fashion. The self-proclaimed sneakerhead—and owner of over 500 pairs of sneakers (mostly Jordans)—is representative of a growing voice of millennial and Gen Z women who are passionate about streetwear and have been demanding more visibility in an industry that has long overlooked their demos for years.

“Establishing my own legacy outside of my father’s is really just taking the knowledge I got from him and making it my own, whether it’s working for the Jordan Brand, but trying to elevate the women’s business now that we have footwear and apparel for women’s collections and so on,” says Jordan. “Prior to my time at Jordan Brand, we only had Maya Moore, our first WNBA player, as part of the brand, but since I’ve been on, we’ve been able to bring on two more female athletes. Seeing that grow and knowing that I’m playing a role in that is definitely something that I will take on as legacy and something I’m proud of.”

COVID-19 has slowed down operations, but Jordan says the brand is always working. So far, Jordan Brand has donated $140 million to community causes in conjunction with its parent company Nike. As far as product launches, Jordan is mum about anything specific on the horizon for now, but assures us that the brand is constantly figuring out ways to keep consumers engaged.

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On a personal level, Jasmine Jordan is already thinking about what she wants the company to look like decades down the line, when her son has next.

“I hope by then that he sees more people within the brand and within the company that obviously look like him, and that he can really identify and have that connection with and be as authentic as he can be,” Jordan says. “And I hope that he feels that working hard and putting the time and the effort into getting where he wants to be is everything; that he understands, and knows that I’m not handing it down to him just because he’s my son; that he had to jump through hoops just like his family did. I think that’s going to definitely teach him to appreciate it more than anything, and that’s something that hopefully, if he does want to follow in my footsteps and become a part of the family business, that he’s able to do.”

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