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It took more than 800 pieces of wood to make this dazzling break dancing stop-motion short

‘Lost in Motions’ is a mesmerizing (and painstaking) project from filmmaker Fernando Livschitz that took 20 days and a whole bunch of wood.

It took more than 800 pieces of wood to make this dazzling break dancing stop-motion short
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While in COVID-19 lockdown, Buenos Aires-based filmmaker Fernando Livschitz wanted to use the time to try something different.

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Livschitz, who heads up the production company Black Sheep Films, typically leans heavily into digital editing to create surreal scenarios such as floating buildings and flying roller coasters. But for his latest short film Lost in Motions, Livschitz collaborated with the artists collective Kijek/Adamski to tap into his tactile side.

“I usually work many hours in front of a computer, but this time I wanted to do something more manual and less digital,” Livschitz says.

Livschitz filmed a break-dancer, separated and numbered each frame, laser cut the images on wood, and positioned them piece by piece to create the final stop-motion video. In total, Lost in Motions used more than 800 pieces of wood and took around 20 days to complete.

Check out Lost in Motions below and watch it to the end to see behind-the-scenes footage of how Livschitz pulled it off.

About the author

KC covers entertainment and pop culture for Fast Company. Previously, KC was part of the Emmy Award-winning team at "Good Morning America," where he was the social media producer.

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