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In honor of John Lewis, stream the documentary ‘Good Trouble’ this weekend. Here’s how

John Lewis, the influential civil rights leader and Georgia Democrat who served in the House of Representatives, passed away on Friday at the age of 80.

In honor of John Lewis, stream the documentary ‘Good Trouble’ this weekend. Here’s how
[Photo: Wikipedia]

John Lewis, the influential civil rights leader and Georgia Democrat who served in the House of Representatives, passed away on Friday at the age of 80. Lewis was the last surviving member of a group of activists known as the “Big Six,” which included Martin Luther King Jr, having helped organize the 1963 March on Washington where King gave his famous “I have a dream” speech. Two years later he survived a brutal police beating at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, in a confrontation known as Bloody Sunday.

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Lewis revealed last year that he had Stage 4 pancreatic cancer. His death has inspired an outpouring of support on social media, along with growing calls to rename the Pettus Bridge after him.

A documentary, John Lewis: Good Trouble, was released earlier this month by Magnolia Pictures, and is available to stream on demand. Directed by Dawn Porter, the movie uses a combination of archival footage and contemporary interviews to chronicle Lewis’s “60-plus years of social activism and legislative action on civil rights, voting rights, gun control, health-care reform and immigration.”

In honor of Lewis’s life and legacy, this would be an excellent weekend to stream the film, which is available to buy or rent. Below are some of the platforms where you can find it:

You can see the full list and learn more about the movie here.

[Courtesy Magnolia Pictures]
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About the author

Christopher Zara is a senior staff news editor for Fast Company and obsessed with media, technology, business, culture, and theater. Before coming to FastCo News, he was a deputy editor at International Business Times, a theater critic for Newsweek, and managing editor of Show Business magazine

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