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How to help Yemen: 6 things you can do right now for the world’s worst humanitarian crisis

Yemen is facing war, starvation, cholera, and the coronavirus pandemic. Meanwhile, relief has plummeted at a time when it’s needed most.

How to help Yemen: 6 things you can do right now for the world’s worst humanitarian crisis
A medical worker wearing full protective gear walks in the intensive care unit of a hospital, where coronavirus patients are treated, on June 15, 2020, Sanaa, Yemen. [Photo: Hani Al-Ansi/picture alliance via Getty Images]

Yemenis need aid money. Now. From us.

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Two years ago, devastating photos in a New York Times article spurred worldwide concern and donations to aid organizations working in Yemen.

The situation has since deteriorated: Yemen currently faces ongoing war, cholera, hunger—and now a swiftly expanding coronavirus outbreak. Making matters worse, the global pandemic has stifled aid funding. A United Nations donors’ conference this month fell $1 billion short of the $2.41 billion target, because the economies of donor nations are struggling. Meanwhile, one in 10 Yeminis depend on cash transfers from relatives or friends who live abroad, which have dried up due to the pandemic. Here’s how you can help:

Larger organizations

  • UN World Food Programme. Provides food to 12 million, as well as support to malnourished mothers and children. In April, WFP halved its food rations, providing families with food every-other-month rather than monthly, due to low funding. Donate here.
  • Médecins Sans Frontieres. Yemen’s healthcare system collapsed years ago. Yemen is one of MSF’s largest in-country programs, with 2,200 staff. It also pays the salaries of 700 Ministry of Health staffers. Yemen is facing a COVID-19 epidemic at a time when half the country’s healthcare facilities are nonoperational.
  • UNICEF. COVID-19 has significantly hurt vulnerable children by closing the services they depend on. Unicef provides water, nutrition, education and protection to vulnerable children. Donate here.

Smaller organizations

  • Mona. This local group buys food and supplies locally and distributes it to displaced families, which bypasses the blockade surrounding Yemen. It was founded by a Yemeni journalist, along with two Canadian and Danish activists. Donate here.
  • Baitulmaal. This smaller organization provides meals, antibiotics, medical test kids, and hygiene kits to people in need. It’s well-rated on Charity Navigator. Donate here.
  • Islamic Relief USA. With over 3,000 volunteers and staffers in the country, this group does what needs to be done, including accessing water sources, fixing solar panels, and distributing medical resources to healthcare services. It also helps other organizations deliver their aid, and is well-rated on Charity Navigator. Donate here.
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