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Seth Rogen is a ceramicist now. No, that’s not a joke

“Kiln it, man.”

Seth Rogen is a ceramicist now. No, that’s not a joke
[Photo: Jerod Harris/Stringer/Getty Images]
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Seth Rogen’s film credits are firmly in the comedy genre, so you might think that the actor’s recent venture into ceramics is some kind of satire. Method acting? A study for a comedic take on the classic Ghost? Nope, Rogen’s newfound hobby is sincere. And the pots and vases he’s pulled out of the kiln are sincerely good. No joke.

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Over the weekend, Rogen tweeted out a picture of seven tall, cylindrical vases that he made. They vary in design and are glazed in different colors, although the similarities in shape and glazing treatment (they’re all speckled) make them look like a complete set.

It’s clear the amateur ceramicist has had some practice—he tweeted out a vase and a tall pot last year. The pieces clearly require at least an intermediate level of skill in wheel throwing. Tall vases are difficult because as the clay gains more height on the wheel, it becomes harder to maintain the center of balance and to keep the walls a consistent width.

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It can be tricky to review the technical merits of a piece—especially from a Twitter photo, according to Ian McDonald, artist-in-residence and the head of the ceramics program at the Cranbrook Academy of Art. “But Twitter doesn’t really care,” says McDonald. “It’s about potential. In that way, he’s doing great!”

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Whatever practicing ceramicists have to say about his technical skill level, Rogen already has a fan base if Hollywood doesn’t work out. Comedian Lilly Singh tweeted, “How do I get a Seth Rogen vase though?”; Busy Phillips really wants one too; BBC Radio 1 film critic Ali Plumb said, “kiln it, man”; and director Josh Safdie tweeted, “You’re really good with pot.” (Turns out the butt of that punny joke partly inspired Rogen’s artistic side in the first place. This all started when he wanted to make the perfect ashtray for his joints.) But it was Rogen’s wife, Lauren Miller, who introduced him to pottery—she’s been doing ceramics since high school. The couple now has a ceramics studio at home.

“I look forward to going home and doing something that has nothing to do with my actual job, and I hope to just keep doing it and keep getting better. There’s no endgame in sight, although it is nice when people seem to like it,” Rogen told Interview last year. “I’ve made enough things in my life that people hate.”

About the author

Lilly Smith is an associate editor of Co.Design. She was previously the editor of Design Observer, and a contributing writer to AIGA Eye on Design.

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