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Audi made a four-hour road-trip video to help you deal with being stuck inside

Audi made a four-hour road-trip video to help you deal with being stuck inside

Stay home.

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That’s been the message to hundreds of millions of people around the world, as countries and communities collectively continue to try and stem the spread of COVID-19. Weeks in, the internet is now flooded with videos, jokes, memes, and stories of fun, heartbreak, and isolation. We’re not built to be stuck inside in one place for so long, and some deal with it more easily than others.

In an eccentric effort to sooth perhaps the most desperate cases of cabin fever, Audi in Australia made a four-hour road-trip video to make people feel like they’re driving the winding roads of the Central Tablelands rather than sinking deeper into the couch.

Created by agency We Are Social, it’s basically a 240-minute car commercial for the A6 sedan.

“During this difficult time for many of us, Audi wanted to create an innovative way of bringing the iconic Australian road trip to people in their homes,” said Nikki Warburton, chief marketing officer at Audi Australia, in a statement. “‘The Drive’ is a digital concept that allows customers to experience the pleasure of the open road from the confines of their home, and to hopefully offer Australians some tranquillity and mental wellbeing during these uncertain and unsettling times.”

This is the latest in brands utilizing many, many, many hours in a variety of ways, following Lexus’s 60,000-hour doc on perfection, and Apple’s five-hour, single-take tour of Russia’s Hermitage museum. It’s a strange trend, and one that will get very old very quickly if not dispatched only in the most creative of instances.

Audi, while delivering an admirable effort, may be the least interesting example of this trend.

The scenery is nice, but it feels a wee bit too much like high-end dashcam footage. Not sure if we’ve been stuck inside long enough—yet!—to make this must-see TV.

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