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Singer Jessie Reyez has a lot to prove—and you have a lot to learn from her process

The Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter finally released her debut studio album ‘Before Love Came to Kill Us.’ How it came together spotlights creative lessons to live by.

Singer Jessie Reyez has a lot to prove—and you have a lot to learn from her process
[Photo: Celine Grouard for Fast Company]

Listen to the latest episode of Fast Company’s podcast Creative Conversation on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, RadioPublic, Google Play, or Stitcher.

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Jessie Reyez thinks she just may have earned the privilege of your time.

The Canadian-Colombian singer-songwriter has certainly made her mark—with two Juno Awards, a Grammy nomination, and songwriting credits for the likes of Normani and Calvin Harris—not to mention her own songs that unabashedly tackle topics like sexual harassment and societal double standards.

With two well-received EPs under her belt (2017’s Kiddo; 2018’s Being Human in Public), Reyez feels like she’s built the right foundation to support the weight of expectations surrounding a debut studio album.

[Photo: Celine Grouard for Fast Company]
“There’s not a lot of artists that can get the world to stop for 45 minutes, 40 minutes to take in a project as a whole. There’re artists that have earned that, like Kendrick, like Beyoncé,” Reyez says. “To be honest, I still feel like I’m working to prove a lot of myself to myself. But, what I’m happy about is that the people that have been rocking with me since Kiddo are waiting for my album.”

Before Love Came to Kill Us, which was released last week, is Reyez’s first full body of work, and on the season 4 premiere of Fast Company‘s podcast Creative Conversation, she outlines the pitfalls, advice, and learning lessons throughout her career that led to this moment.

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[Photo: Celine Grouard for Fast Company]
In this episode of Creative Conversation, Reyez explains . . . .

. . . why she has trouble writing happy songs

“I feel like when I’m happy, it’s emotion I like to be in, so my body doesn’t automatically react.”

. . . how she learned the importance of editing her own work

“You have to really make a conscious effort, because you’re going to have a bias. Why? Because, no parent thinks their kid is ugly.”

. . . and how she’s defined creativity for herself

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“It’s not feeling restrained to somebody else’s idea of what the vision should be, not feeling restrained to people’s perception of who I am and the kind of music I need to be making, not feeling restrained for what I should wear and what certain people think that I need to be wearing to certain events.”

Listen to the latest episode of Fast Company’s podcast Creative Conversation on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, RadioPublic, Google Play, or Stitcher.

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About the author

KC covers entertainment and pop culture for Fast Company. Previously, KC was part of the Emmy Award-winning team at "Good Morning America," where he was the social media producer.

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