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Supply-chain researchers pinpoint why Mondays are bad for business

Orders are filled 10% slower on Mondays.

Supply-chain researchers pinpoint why Mondays are bad for business
[Photo: Alexander Kovacs/Unsplash]

Feeling sluggish today? You are not alone. It’s Monday, and a study of 800,000 order transactions found that “Mondays have poorer performance than other days of the week,” even after controlling for other factors.

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At issue: supply-chain slovenliness. Monday orders take 10% longer to be processed, longer to be fulfilled, and result in more “short shipments”—when an item is listed as shipped, but not in the package or received. The study, out of Lehigh University, focused on a year of orders from the General Services Administration, the agency that provides supplies for the federal government.

The researchers suggest that managers combat the “Monday Effect” by:

  • increasing Monday staffing
  • holding meetings on other days
  • offering “additional pay or mood-lifters such as free coffee or motivational tasks”
  • automating tasks where possible

They also suggest that Monday work be double-checked.

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Previous studies have shown that Mondays negatively impact productivity, psychological states, and finances. Hang in there. It’ll be Tuesday soon.

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