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Here’s how the ‘writers room’ inside a Tinder dude’s head puts together a message

This hilarious video shows what goes through a guy’s mind while crafting an opening message on Tinder. It’s just like the writers room on a bad comedy show.

Here’s how the ‘writers room’ inside a Tinder dude’s head puts together a message

What: A video that opens a window into the head of a guy trying to nail that first message with a match on Tinder.

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Who: Beloved sketch group BriTANick.

Why we care: You never get a second chance to make a first impression. So, it’s something of a mystery why so many men are so terrible at dating app outreach.

Maybe it’s the very fact of how fleeting the window of opportunity is that makes them willing to sacrifice all dignity and reason in a misguided effort to stand out from the herd. Maybe it’s simple ignorance around what makes women tick. In any case, lots of hetero, Tinder-using women have entire libraries of screenshots from embarrassing exchanges with regrettable men. Some of them are Penthouse letter-gross, some of them are just lazy, and some of them read like blistering screeds cut-and-pasted from an MRA forum. Many of them beg the question: How the hell did they think this would work?

A new video by reliably funny sketch duo BriTANick offers a convincing answer.

“Dating App Writers Room” starts with a digital lothario (played by Jon Bass) finding a potential mate on Love Match. (For legal reasons, one imagines, they can’t explicitly say Tinder.) As he begins to compose his opening salvo, we travel inside his head, where a very sitcom-like writers room is ready to work on The Ashley Project. What follows is a scorching takedown of both the average horny bro’s thought process—and the mediocrity-inducing dynamic of the average writers room. BriTANick is comprised of Brian McElhaney and Nick Kocher, who have written for Saturday Night Live and It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, and thus have some insight into how this process works.

Have a look at the sketch below, which will hopefully offer a moment of catharsis for the receivers of bad dude messages, or a moment of self-reflection for those who write them.

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