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Who in the heck would want to sleep over in an Ikea?!?

An Ikea sleepover is coming to Brooklyn. Who’s in?

Who in the heck would want to sleep over in an Ikea?!?
[Source Image: STR/AFP/Getty Images, artran/iStock]

You wake up at 2 a.m., but you’re not in your bed. You’re in a maze, a dark labyrinth from which there is seemingly no escape. The floor is cold concrete on your feet. And in the air? A distinct hint of strange, sweet, roasted meats. What’s on the menu? Could it be . . . you?

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This is what I imagine a sleepover at Ikea would feel like. And yet, Ikea has announced its Swede Dreams Sleepover anyway. On March 13, which happens to be World Sleep Day, the furniture giant will let select customers sleep over in its Brooklyn, NY, and Costa Mesa, CA, stores and partake in some of the strangest party games you’ve ever heard of, including an ASMR-infused Insomniac Lounge and a silent disco.

[Screenshot: Ikea]

While only a few Ikea “Family Members” will get the opportunity to sleep over—register here if you’re interested—on February 22, Ikea is promoting After Dark in-store events for anyone to come to, from 3 p.m.-9 p.m. Along with discounts on bedding, Ikea will be offering workshops on how to sleep, yoga/meditation, and something called a “selfie bed.” (I don’t know what that means either, and to be frank, I don’t really want to find out.)

In any case, the event is a good example of Ikea’s ever-evolving retail strategy as it finds creative ways to get people to its giant warehouses. The events are a means to lure in customers to stores, offering in-person services and experiences that merely buying a mattress or bed frame online can’t match—especially for a fanbase that already tries to play hide-and-seek in its stores. And while spending the night in an Ikea, a place of stress and indecision, sounds like my literal nightmare, we can all see the appeal of a better night’s sleep.

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About the author

Mark Wilson is a senior writer at Fast Company who has written about design, technology, and culture for almost 15 years. His work has appeared at Gizmodo, Kotaku, PopMech, PopSci, Esquire, American Photo and Lucky Peach

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