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This $5,000 iPhone was inspired by the Cybertruck

So metal, bro.

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Love it or hate it, the Cybertruck is the vehicle du jour. The stainless steel electric vehicle has an aggressive retrofuturist aesthetic that, much like Tesla CEO Elon Musk himself, cannot be ignored. The Cybertruck has inspired redesigns, a post-apocalyptic metallic bunker, and plenty of merch.

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And now you can buy a Cybertruck-ified iPhone. Produced by the Russian luxury electronics studio Caviar, the Cyberphone is an iPhone 11 Pro that’s been modified to live inside a super rugged, titanium case. Mashable reports the product starts at $5,256, in a limited run of 99 units.

It’s eye-gougingly hideous. While a polygonal, metal smartphone with too-sharp edges should be just the sort of absurdist “sign me up!” bait I spend my days on the internet to discover, this case is full of protruding hinges, a strange metal grain, and superfluous angles that look less like Cybertruck’s folded steel minimalism than some sort of Terminator excrement.

The function of the design is intriguing, though: The case wraps around the iPhone’s fragile glass screen for full protection when it’s not in use. The shell also folds up to form its own stand.

But the Cyberphone pays homage to the Cybertruck in name only. Its extra details and hinges miss the entire logical premise that gives the Cybertruck its steel body in the first place. The body is designed to be mass-produced in the simplest way possible: folding one big piece of metal. In that sense, the Cybertruck is designed around just the sorts of constraints we see in typical industrial design, which optimizes material and shape around the most efficient production processes possible. In that sense, the Cybertruck of smartphones already exists. It’s the iPhone.

About the author

Mark Wilson is a senior writer at Fast Company who has written about design, technology, and culture for almost 15 years. His work has appeared at Gizmodo, Kotaku, PopMech, PopSci, Esquire, American Photo and Lucky Peach

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