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Priyanka Chopra has the perfect advice for Gen Z activists like Greta Thunberg on dealing with trolls

Priyanka Chopra has the perfect advice for Gen Z activists like Greta Thunberg on dealing with trolls
Fast Company Editor In Chief, Stephanie Mehta, (left) and Priyanka Chopra (right). [Photo: courtesy of Michael Calabrò]

With more than 73 million followers on Twitter and Instagram alone, Priyanka Chopra Jonas has surely dealt with her share of trolls. So when the Indian superstar was asked this afternoon if she has any advice for a younger generation of women activists—Gen Z change-makers like Greta Thunberg, Malala Yousafzai, and Emma Gonzalez, to name a few—she was quick to offer her thoughts on how to cope with daily onslaughts from anonymous haters who pollute social media with viciousness and bile.

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“It doesn’t matter—focus on the positive,” Chopra said in an interview with Fast Company editor-in-chief Stephanie Mehta at the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. “Focus on the change [you] have the ability to make . . . Go to sleep at night knowing that you created a revolution.”

“The people who are supporting you are so much more than the people who are trolling,” she added.

Chopra was in Davos to discuss, among other things, Global Citizen Live, a series of concerts taking place in cities around the world on September 26 with the collective goal of fighting poverty, inequality, and climate change. She has also been urging billionaires at the elite event to use their enormous wealth for social good.

The 37-year-old actress said she has been inspired by the younger generation of women and girls whose activism dominates headlines (and often visibly irks older, if not less mature, world leaders like Donald Trump). Part of the reason why the world is captivated by these young activists now, Chopra says, is that technology has enabled and empowered them to share their messages unfiltered.

“Their voices are not being edited by men who happen to be journalists,” Chopra says. “They can talk straight to people, and I can consume it on my smartphone and my laptop anywhere around the world. And I think it’s an incredible thing.”

To the extent that social media is giving a voice to women and girls who might have been voiceless in an earlier era, Chopra is quick to credit earlier generations, including her own millennial generation, for paving the way.

“I really think our generation led by example,” she says. “And now you see those girls who are coming up, and I really hope to raise my children in a world where people are listening to them—where world leaders are listening to these girls because they make so much sense.”

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