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Brand warriors! Instagram gurus! Here are the most ridiculous job titles of 2019

The weirdest job titles can be found in all corners of the U.S.

Brand warriors! Instagram gurus! Here are the most ridiculous job titles of 2019
[Photo: Denerio Watkins/Unsplash]

Whether they’re used to signal a hiring manager’s sense of humor or simply to stand out from the masses of managers, supervisors, and vice presidents, playful job titles continue to proliferate in 2019.

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Jobs platform Indeed analyzed one million postings to reveal which of the weirdest terms appeared in either the title or the description of a job over 12 months. The top five (“ninja,” “rockstar,” “genius,” “hero,” and “guru”) all retained their popularity from last year.

“Rockstar” nabbed the top spot, boasting a 31% year-over-year increase and a whopping 209% lift since the company started ranking in 2015. “Genius” had a 26% year-over-year lift but rose 416% over the four years. The news was not so positive for ninjas or gurus whose popularity declined by 9% and 15% respectively.

According to Indeed’s analysis, wacky job titles are now more prevalent outside of tech hubs like Silicon Valley. Now you’re much more likely to locate rockstars in Arkansas, geniuses in Oklahoma, and ninjas in Hawaii. Vermont takes the crown away from New York for having the largest number of hero job openings this year.

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Gurus may not be as popular, but hiring managers are seeking their wisdom across all manner of jobs in California. Indeed reports that the most common titles are: “Client Services Guru,” “Instagram Guru,” “Numbers Guru,” and “Hair Guru.”

A word of caution to those dreaming up these clever titles: Indeed says most job seekers aren’t necessarily looking to be a superhero or a rockstar (at least not outside the privacy of their personal space). But that hasn’t stopped intrepid hiring managers from posting ads seeking a “Software Ninjaneer,” “Content Hero,” or “Brand Warrior.”

And while the Chief Heart Officer (HR Manager) and Director of Fundom (Marketing Manager) sound like delightful positions,” writes Amanda Pinney at Indeed, “the Colon Lover (Copywriter) might turn a few heads at a networking event.”

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About the author

Lydia Dishman is a staff editor for Fast Company's Work Life section. She has written for CBS Moneywatch, Fortune, The Guardian, Popular Science, and the New York Times, among others.

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