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Ellen DeGeneres wants you to stop buying fur and use these soft faux-fur blankets instead

The celebrity wants to move the fur-free movement along by creating products that provide an alternative to animal skins.

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In case you hadn’t gotten the memo, fur is out. Luxury brands ranging from Prada to Gucci have stopped incorporating fur into their products, Macy’s has banned fur from its stores, and even Queen Elizabeth II has ditched fur.

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Ellen DeGeneres also supports the fur-free movement, and she believes that one way to cut down on the demand for real fur is to create faux fur products that look and feel as close to the real thing as possible. So, together with Leo Livzhetz, she’s launched UnHide, a brand that makes super soft, fur-like products.

The brand is launching with a $165 blanket called the Marshmallow and a smaller $65 blanket called the ‘Lil Marsh. The blankets are made entirely from polyester and are manufactured in China. The exterior is designed to mimic Chinchilla fur, while the interior is velvet, and the whole thing feels like an incredibly soft, cuddly throw blanket that is perfect for the cold winter months.

Unlike fur, which has to be cleaned at a specialty cleaner, this blanket can be machine washed and air-dried. But UnHide’s founders plan to move beyond home goods into fashion products over time. The company is investing heavily in material innovation to create faux fur of different textures that are adapted to things like coats and accessories.

In keeping with the brand’s mission, UnHide is also working to ban the sale of real fur. Despite the growth of the fur-free movement, there are still more than 100 million animals being killed for fur annually through gassing, electrocution, and traps. The company will donate a portion of its proceeds to the Humane Society of the United States, which is campaigning against the manufacture and sale of fur products.

About the author

Elizabeth Segran, Ph.D., is a staff writer at Fast Company. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts

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