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The first crystal-clear eraser will delight young and old designers alike

The first crystal-clear eraser will delight young and old designers alike

The Pepto Bismol pink eraser is an icon, and for good reason. Early erasers were made in part of pumice, a ruddy, Italian volcanic ash that helped the eraser wipe away pigment. So an eraser’s pink color was a byproduct of its function. Yet in the modern era, even though eraser manufacturers have long moved on from using pumice, erasers are still pink, or often, opaquely colored in some way, both as a both manner of tradition and means to include murky, abrasive components. And that means they have a downside: You can never actually see what you’re erasing because the eraser is in the way.

But now, a 51-year-old Japanese eraser company named Seed has developed something of a breakthrough in the world of sketch hygiene. Spotted by Gizmodo, it’s a transparent eraser called the Clear Radar. In your hand, it looks like a chunk of glass, or perhaps a crystal, allowing you to peer right through it to see the words or lines you are wiping away.

Of course, we’ve all been tempted by novelty erasers before. But apparently, this one actually works as a decent eraser should. Seed spent five years perfecting the formula to create the eraser you can [barely see] here, which costs all of $1.40 for the jumbo version. $1.40! When is the last time you really wanted something that cost $1.40?

Unfortunately, there doesn’t seem to be an easy way to order erasers on Seed’s site. And that’s a shame, not only for those of us who want a Clear Radar but for those of us tempted by this five-pound behemoth eraser that Seed makes, too.

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