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This K-Pop band already has 2.5 million YouTube views—for an in-flight safety video

Super M in space and a reminder of stowing away electronics? Sign us up.

This K-Pop band already has 2.5 million YouTube views—for an in-flight safety video

What: Korean Air’s new inflight safety video, starring chart-topping K-pop boy band Super M and K-Pop mainstay BoA, the first K-Pop star to make it to the Billboard charts back in 2009.

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Where: Required viewing from your seat aboard any Korean Air flight. Armchair travelers can check it out on YouTube. Since it dropped on November 4, over 2.5 million viewers have done just that.

Why we love it: The trend toward attention-grabbing airline safety videos is becoming one of the best things about air travel. This five-minute video provides all the necessary safety information: seatback up, tray table down, electronics stored, etc, etc. But this safety video has the added bonus of seeing Super M in a space-age setting, singing, dancing, fastening their seat belts, stowing their devices, and of course, looking pensive en route to their final destination. While Super M settles in, over in the “Kids Zone,” an adorable cartoon bear named Yo Yo teaches a group of tiny travelers how to put on their life vests to a pulsing hip-hop beat. It’s very cute and extremely entertaining.

Korean Air’s new video follows in the footsteps of United Airlines, which partnered with the movie Spider-Man: Far from Home to create its very meta safety video last year. In 2014, Air New Zealand created what it called “The Most Epic Safety Video Ever Made,” starring director Peter Jackson, the cast of Lord of the Rings, halfings, elves, and some lovely shots of Middle Earth. It’s collected 26 million YouTube videos and is still going strong.

Airlines love partnering with celebrities and brands, because studies show passengers are more likely to remember safety instructions that are more like music videos or film shorts. Brands love it because it’s a great way to talk up a product to a captive audience. Passengers love it, because they already know how to put on a seat belt, but it’s good to be reminded how to use those oxygen masks.

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