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Is ‘OK, boomer’ an ageist slur? These 18 hilarious takes say definitely not

Generational warfare is flaring up online, but everyone can agree this bad tweet deserved all of its mocking responses.

Is ‘OK, boomer’ an ageist slur? These 18 hilarious takes say definitely not
[Photo: iStock]

Conservative talk-show host Bob Lonsberry, who was born in 1959, which makes him part of that persecuted class of the largest generation in U.S. history, tweeted (then deleted) the following on Monday: “‘Boomer’ is the n-word of agesim. Being hip and flip does not make bigotry ok, nor is a derisive epithet acceptable because it is new.”

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Ironic coming from a man whose controversial views have gotten him suspended, sued, protested, and canned, leading Lonsberry to take the self-proclaimed title of being “the most fired man in Rochester media.”

Responses to Lonsberry’s tweet were what you’d expect—annoyed millennials and Gen-Zers replying primarily with #OkBoomer. Even Dictionary.com got in on the action by expertly pointing out that using “boomer” sarcastically could never amount to using the n-word, one of the most offensive words in the English language.

There’s obviously a generational divide. That is always the case, because every generation ages out of being cool and eventually just doesn’t like or understand what the generations behind them are doing.

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However, rage against boomers has been mounting online for some time. Boomers are accused of destroying the planet, bankrupting social security, destroying the housing market, and writing disparaging think pieces against “the snowflake generation”—just to name a few infractions. According to Know Your Meme, the earliest cases of #OkBoomer being used online can be traced to April 2018. It was used in response to tweets written by politicians criticizing Gen Z and millennials. The phrase, though, didn’t really begin to take off until January 2019, when the catchphrase started to spawn memes. There’s also merchandise.

Lonsberry eventually deleted his tweet, but not before the internet army of youth culture got to him first, propelling #Boomer into the top 10 Twitter trends.

Dictionary.com’s first reply was probably the most eloquent response, but even it couldn’t resist joining the slaughter. Let’s take a look at some of the funniest, smartest, and most predictable responses to Lonsberry’s offending tweet:

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And where do Gen-Xers fit in all of this? Somewhere between apathy and ambivalence.

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Finally, let’s hear it for the replies to Lonsberry’s tweet that might otherwise be lost:

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