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Floyd is launching a mattress for its beloved minimalist bed frame

Customers kept asking the Detroit startup which mattress to buy for its ultra-popular bed frame, so it designed one.

Back in 2015, the fledgling Detroit-based furniture brand Floyd launched a minimal, low-slung platform bed. The design was simple—just a few slabs of wood which you would connect with a few metal components, no tools required—but it quickly developed a cult following. You’ve likely seen pictures of it, covered in rumpled sheets dappled with sunshine from a nearby window, while skimming through interior design posts on Instagram.

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In the four years since its launch, Floyd sold more than 21,000 of the bed frames. But customers kept asking for recommendations about what mattress to buy for it. “People often buy their mattress and bed at the same time,” says Kyle Hoff, Floyd’s cofounder and CEO. “There wasn’t a mattress on the market we loved enough to recommend to our customers, so we decided to make one ourselves.”

Today, Floyd releases its brand-new mattress, a year in the making, which can be delivered in the mail alongside the brand’s other flatpack furniture. It starts at a cost of $795 for a twin mattress and goes up to $1,195 for a king-size version.

[Photo: courtesy Floyd]

Floyd’s mission, since it launched five years ago, has been to design furniture that’s ultra-durable and movable—the company’s bed frame, for instance, grows with the customer as they move through different phases of life. You can start with the $495 twin size but then extend it into a queen or a king over time.

While it doesn’t expand, the mattress was developed fit in with that ethos of durability. Unlike many other beds-in-a-box, Floyd’s mattress is not made of memory foam, but rather a blend of foam and pocketed coils, which the company believes last longer. The team found a manufacturer in Mississippi, which lets them work closely with the people producing their design. “We like being close to our factories so we can keep an eye on quality,” says Hoff. “And we think these coil mattresses are more likely to hold up over time.” (The Floyd mattress is guaranteed to last 10 years, on par with Casper and Nectar. Saatva, a premium mattress brand, guarantees its mattresses for 15 years.)

The ten-inch-tall mattress—designed to fit the low profile of its hit bed frame—is backed with a non-skid material to prevent slipping, and comes with a 30-day return policy. Hoff says that the Floyd team scoured the country to find a facility that would take used mattresses that people return. “Our goal is to keep furniture out of landfills,” says Hoff. “We hope that our customers love their mattress, but if they don’t, we want to make sure they are still used.”

Floyd launched in 2014 with a single product: A leg that could be attached to any surface to create a table. Over the last five years, the company has grown quickly, thanks, in part, to an infusion of $1o million in capital. Today, it sells everything from shelving to sofas that are designed in a modular way. It has taken aim at Ikea, in particular; a few years ago, the company bought billboards near Ikea locations and displayed the words “Eat their meatballs. Buy our bed frame.” The $29 billion mattress industry, is a logical next step.

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“We don’t think furniture should be disposable,” says Hoff. “We’re still focused on the mission we had from the beginning, which was to create furniture that you can carry with you through life.”

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About the author

Elizabeth Segran, Ph.D., is a staff writer at Fast Company. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts

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