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Here’s what we just learned from the whistle-blower complaint about Trump

Here’s what we just learned from the whistle-blower complaint about Trump
[Photo: Srikanta H. U/Unsplash]

Congress released an anonymous whistle-blower complaint Thursday tied to President Trump’s conversation with Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky, where he urged Zelensky to pursue investigations into Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden.

Here’s what we learned from the complaint:

  • Transcript removed? In addition to the summary of the call that was released to the public Wednesday, there’s allegedly an “official word-for-word transcript” of the call. White House officials allegedly removed it from the computer system where such records are usually kept to load it into another system normally used for highly sensitive classified information. “One White House official described this act as an abuse of this electronic system because the call did not contain anything remotely sensitive from a national security perspective,” according to the complaint.
  • Giuliani’s involvement: Rudy Giuliani allegedly traveled to Madrid to meet with one of Zelensky’s advisers and separately reached out to other high-ranking Ukrainian officials. Multiple U.S. officials said they were “deeply concerned by what they viewed as Mr. Giuliani’s circumvention of national security decisionmaking processes to engage with Ukrainian officials and relay messages back and forth between Kyiv and the President,” according to the complaint
  • Pressure to “play ball”: Ukrainian officials were allegedly led to believe that if they wanted to see a meeting between Zelensky and Trump, they would have to show “willingness to ‘play ball’ on the issues” involved.
  • CrowdStrike mystery: The whistle-blower also doesn’t understand why Trump alluded to security firm CrowdStrike and Democratic National Committee servers on the call with Zelensky. “I do not know why the President associates these servers with Ukraine,” the whistle-blower wrote.

The acting director of national intelligence is testifying about the complaint before Congress today, including a televised House Intelligence Committee hearing and a closed-door Senate hearing.

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