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New York Times Magazine’s powerful ‘1619 Project’ is now in podcast form

New York Times Magazine’s powerful ‘1619 Project’ is now in podcast form
[Photo: Ajay Suresh/Wikimedia Commons]

Four hundred years ago, the first African slave was dragged against their will to the land that would become the United States. To mark that solemn occasion and reflect on the impact of slavery throughout U.S. history, the New York Times Magazine launched the 1619 Project last weekend, immediately garnering widespread praise as it seeks to reframe conversations about America. (It also ignited a firestorm among people who don’t like to be reminded about the country’s racist past, present, and probable future.)

The project, which combines essays with interactive content, is an attempt to address “the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of the story of we tell ourselves about who we are.” The stories cover everything from electoral politics to the prison-industrial complex to the role of sugar in our diet, tracing the throughline of slavery and racism from the early days of the U.S. through the Jim Crow era to the racial inequality that still exists today. The series is led by reporter (and MacArthur Grant winner) Nikole Hannah-Jones, who writes that since that boat landed 400 years ago, “no aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed.”

The project is powerful and important and is now available as a podcast. If you didn’t have time to read the magazine this weekend, subscribe to the first episode here, so you’ll be ready when it drops on Friday and you can start listening to the project Newt Gingrich deemed “propaganda.”

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