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Jeffrey Epstein dead: Here’s what we know so far

Jeffrey Epstein dead: Here’s what we know so far
Jeffrey Epstein [Photo: Rick Friedman/Rick Friedman Photography/Corbis via Getty Images]

Jeffrey Epstein, the disgraced financier who stood accused of child sex trafficking, was found dead in a Manhattan jail cell on Saturday morning, officials confirmed to numerous news outlets. Here’s what we know so far:

  • Epstein’s body was found on Saturday morning at approximately 7:30 a.m. at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan, the New York Times reports.
  • Media outlets are reporting the death as an apparent suicide by hanging.
  • Three weeks earlier, Epstein, 66, was found semiconscious in what was reported as an attempted suicide. However, he was apparently not on suicide watch at the time of his death, according to NBC News. Per the Times, Epstein was “left alone and not closely monitored.”
  • A judge denied Epstein bail in mid-July after deeming him an “extraordinary” flight risk.
  • The day before his death, a trove of previously sealed documents were made public by a federal appeals court, revealing stunning new details about Epstein’s alleged sex crimes and his inner circle of enablers. The documents were part of a deposition from a woman who claims Epstein kept her as a “sex slave.”
  • Reports of Epstein’s death immediately raised eyebrows on social media, sparking wild speculation about how a high-profile person and known suicide risk could take his own life in prison. Even those who normally wouldn’t traffic in conspiracy theories conceded that the details were difficult to process. However, some cautioned not drawing reckless conclusions—at this point, there are still too many unknowns.
  • Despite an autopsy having been performed, Epstein’s official cause of death still hasn’t been determined. The Medical Examiner’s Office said it needs further information, the New York Post reports.
  • Epstein’s sudden death does not mean his coconspirators will be let off the hook. Federal prosecutors are continuing their investigation, WSJ reports, and a growing body of evidence could lead them to other targets.

This story is developing . . . 

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