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How to follow up after a job interview without being annoying

You want to know where you stand, but there’s a right and a wrong way to follow up after a job interview.

How to follow up after a job interview without being annoying
[Photo: rawpixel.com/Pexels]

For many people, the entire job interview process can feel like blind dating: Do you like them? Do they like you? Is there a future? And just like with dating, even if that first meeting went well, it’s totally possible to screw it up if you follow up in the wrong way.

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With job interviews, there’s a well-known way to make a good impression: Send a thank you note. And a surefire way to sour a good thing is to annoy the hiring manager by checking in too frequently or too aggressively. But there are still many things in the process that can be confusing: What exactly should your thank you note say? How long should you wait before checking in? What if you get another job offer?

We tackle all of these questions and more in this week’s episode of Secrets of the Most Productive People.  In the meantime, here are three quick tips on how to make a good impression after a job interview.

1. Send a thank you note. Sending a short message thanking the hiring manager for your time is only going to benefit you and doesn’t need to take more than five minutes. Make sure to keep it short, but highlight something from the interview that showed you were paying attention and that you’re excited to work for the company. This could be something like, “After discussing about how company X approached Y, I’m even more excited about the opportunity to use my skills and experience to help the company achieve Z.”

2. Be judicious in your follow-up. Keep your follow-up short, and know when to cut your losses. If you email twice and nobody responds, it’s probably best to move on.

3. Don’t burn bridges. Sometimes a company tells you that they are going to let you know their decision by a certain date, only to fall short. Now, there’s nothing wrong with following up and inquiring, but keep your tone cordial and understanding. No one likes an overly demanding candidate, and having that kind of demeanor will only hurt you.

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You can find the episode on Apple PodcastsGoogle PlayStitcherSpotifyRadioPublic, or wherever you get your podcasts.

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About the author

Kathleen Davis is Deputy Editor at FastCompany.com. Previously, she has worked as an editor at Entrepreneur.com, WomansDay.com and Popular Photography magazine.

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