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Tropical Storm Barry live cams let you track its dangerous path through the Gulf

Tropical Storm Barry live cams let you track its dangerous path through the Gulf

Barry, the first tropical storm to threaten the United States this year, is expected to hit the Louisiana coast by Saturday morning, and there is still a significant chance that it could become a hurricane, with sustained winds of 74 miles per hour at landfall. The National Hurricane Center has issued a hurricane warning for much of Louisiana’s Gulf Coast.

So far, though, it’s not the wind that is making this storm so treacherous; it’s the relentless rain. By the time the slow-moving storm blows through, some areas could be drenched by as much as 25 inches of rain. Because Barry is so sluggish—crawling across the Gulf at just 3 mph according to the National Hurricane Center—it is expected to cause widespread flooding as it lingers in place dumping water. Louisiana’s Plaquemines Parish and Grand Isle are already under mandatory evacuations, and the streets of New Orleans are already flooded. New Orleans mayor LaToya Cantrell has declared a state of emergency.

Armchair meteorologists can track Barry’s progress courtesy of live-stream video feeds from within its path. Of course, it’s not just Louisiana that is under threat from the gathering storm, and AL.com has a full list of webcams across the Gulf that are monitoring Barry, like this one from the Port of New Orleans, this one from Biloxi, Mississippi, and this one straight from Margaritaville.

Here are a few in New Orleans that are keeping an eye on the rising water:

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