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So this is what 2019 tastes like

Fast Company explores the new business of food.

So this is what 2019 tastes like
[Photo: Maja Saphir for Fast Company]

Walk into a grocery store—or open a food-shopping app—and it’s easy to feel paralyzed these days: Ziplock bags and cling wrap are bad for the environment, but . . . what’s the alternative? Same goes for meat and dairy: Even the organic, grass-fed varieties are a strain on the planet. When it comes to snack bars, which ones are good for us? And who gets to decide what that even means? And then there’s water. The bottles are problematic, and inside, what are we really getting?

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The quandaries don’t stop when dining out. Meat-free burgers are suddenly ubiquitous, even at fast-food restaurants, yet Arby’s is defiantly telling customers to stick with the beef. Beer has suddenly become . . . an exercise supplement? And if you work at Google, the bag of chips you reach for this afternoon could decide a small food company’s future.

Food manufacturers and marketers know that we’re wrestling with these conundrums. They are, too. This week, Fast Company investigates some of the substantial shifts shaking up the food industry. You’ll read new takes on how food companies are struggling with trends such as “wellness” and crises such as global warming—and how some of the bravest ones are managing to keep a sense of humor.


More from Fast Company’s series on “The New Business of Food”:


[Photos: pamela_d_mcadams (fig bars), MariuszBlach (cookie), HONG VO (tangerines), vovashevchuk (hops), gregepperson (rock climber), branex (cows), Valengilda (prosciutto), Milkos (hand), Samohin (aluminium can),solucionfotografica (wine glass), by-studio (grapes), somchaisom (paper carton),m-imagephotography (jogger)/iStock;Chang Qing (grass), Kirsten Carr (chickens)/Unsplash, clouds/Maxpixel; yellow bag courtesy of Baggu]

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