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How to see the solar eclipse if you’re not in South America

How to see the solar eclipse if you’re not in South America
[Photo: Jongsun Lee/Unsplash]

The first great solar eclipse of 2019 is set to take place today when the moon will briefly upstage the sun, blocking its light for four and a half minutes.

Most of South America will witness a partial eclipse, but a 70-mile radius stretching from La Serena, Chile, to Buenos Aires, Argentina, as well as a small area of the Pacific Ocean, will experience the total eclipse. For those lucky people in the path of totality, the eclipse will be visible between 4:38 p.m. and 4:44 p.m. ET as the moon moves between the Earth and Sun, blocking the sun’s rays.

While space enthusiasts in the rest of the world won’t be able to look up at the sky in their AAS-approved eclipse viewing glasses to see the movement of the moon, thanks to technology the eclipse is visible anywhere in the world to those with internet access. (For North American eclipse fans, mark your calendar, book your campsites, and stock up on solar eclipse glasses now for April 2024 when the next big total solar eclipse will pass over North American skies, plunging a stretch of land from Mexico to Texas to Maine into the path of totality.)

Here are four ways to watch the solar eclipse today from anywhere under the sun:

  • The Exploratorium museum in San Francisco is partnering with NASA to live stream the eclipse. Their coverage begins Tuesday at 3 p.m. ET. Since solar eclipses are so exciting, they are dedicating three channels to the event: there’s one for live telescope views from an observatory in Vicuna, Chile, and two more for commentary in English and Spanish. You can view that broadcast on the museum’s website or through their free app for iOS or Android.
  • NASA Television will also carry the English-language coverage on its channel.
  • Slooh, which has a system of robotic telescopes around the world, will air live coverage from its observatories in Chile and Argentina between 3:15 and 5:40 p.m. E.T.
  • The European Southern Observatory will stream its own live coverage of the event from its facility in Chile’s Atacama Desert. And while reservations are sold out to witness the celestial event in person at the observatory, keep that option in mind for the next great space event taking place in Southern skies.

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