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Interview nerves getting the best of you? LinkedIn’s latest tools may help

80% of millennials admit to getting stumped by interview questions. LinkedIn is offering new ways to practice and ditch the anxiety.

Interview nerves getting the best of you? LinkedIn’s latest tools may help
[Photo: Rawpixel/Pexels]
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Sweaty palms and nervous stomachs are apparently par for the course when interviewing for a job you really want, according to new LinkedIn data.

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More than a third (37%) of millennials surveyed would rather spend an entire weekend cleaning than meet with a hiring manager, and 15% feel nervous enough to vomit before every interview. Their anxiety appears to well founded. The majority (80%) of millennials admit to being stumped by an interview question.

LinkedIn is coming to the rescue by rolling out a suite of tools to help practice and prepare for a variety of situations.

Starting next week in English-speaking countries, LinkedIn’s mobile app and desktop site will offer members tips, answers to the most asked interview questions, the ability to practice responses, and expert advice on how to approach each conversation.

For instance, job seekers who are stressing about answering some of the more common interview questions can watch short videos that dish up expert advice from veteran recruiters. They can also practice answering them on the platform privately and evaluate their performance by playing back their recorded replies. Premium members get an added bonus of exclusive access to examples of expert-approved sample interview answers. All this can be accessed through their applied jobs dashboard.

LinkedIn says that later this summer it will launch an additional tool that allows members to privately share their recordings with trusted connections to get feedback, coaching, and advice.

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No excuse for nerves now.

About the author

Lydia Dishman is a reporter writing about the intersection of tech, leadership, and innovation. She is a regular contributor to Fast Company and has written for CBS Moneywatch, Fortune, The Guardian, Popular Science, and the New York Times, among others.

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