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How to watch the 2019 Women’s World Cup live without cable

A quick guide for cord cutters who want to watch the soccer games on their computers, phones, or smart TVs.

How to watch the 2019 Women’s World Cup live without cable
[Photo: Rich Graessle/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images]

Get ready to cozy up to your work computer or smartphone for a mid-afternoon break, because the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup kicks off today—and, this time, the United States is actually going in a winner.

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The international soccer tournament, now in its eighth year, is taking place in France, where the world champion U.S. women’s national soccer team will defend their title. The first game, France versus South Korea, is scheduled to begin today (Friday, June 7) at 3 p.m. ET. The full tournament includes 24 teams playing out 52 games, and it goes through July 7. You can find the full schedule here.

For cord cutters who want to watch the Women’s World Cup live on their computers, phones, or smart TVs, you’ll need to access Fox and Fox Sports 1, which have the broadcasting and streaming rights. There are a few different ways to access the feeds, either through a standalone streaming service, or via Fox’s website and mobile apps. I’ve rounded up some choices below.

  • Streaming services: Many popular streaming services offer Fox on various packages, including Hulu With Live TV, YouTube TV, SlingTVPlayStation Vue, and FuboTV. Most of these services are offering free trials, and they’re easy to cancel.
  • Fox Sports mobile apps: You can access Fox Sports on its mobile apps on iOS or Android. Unfortunately, you’ll need login credentials from a pay-TV provider.
  • Fox Sports online: Technically, you can access live TV on the Fox Sports website, but again, you’ll need a cable or satellite TV login.
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About the author

Christopher Zara is a senior staff news editor for Fast Company and obsessed with media, technology, business, culture, and theater. Before coming to FastCo News, he was a deputy editor at International Business Times, a theater critic for Newsweek, and managing editor of Show Business magazine

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