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How this Square executive helps small business owners compete online

How this Square executive helps small business owners compete online
[Illustration: Artur Tenczyński]


Being able to order dinner, buy a shirt, and book a haircut in the span of a train ride home is nirvana for consumers. But for the merchants fielding those digital requests while also trying to run a brick-and-mortar business, it’s a nightmare. Alyssa Henry, who oversees the engineering and product teams for payments company Square, has spent the past year creating solutions for them. “A lot of our ideas come from observing how [businesses] are hacking the experience that we’ve already given them,” she says. Last year, she turned these observations into new products.

Square Online Store

Using tech-nology from Weebly, which Square acquired for $365 million in 2018, this new e-commerce product allows sellers to quickly erect a sophisticated online storefront, sync their online and offline inventory, calculate shipping costs, and manage delivery. They can also sell on Instagram, thanks to a “link in bio” integration.

Square for Restaurants

Restaurants can now field online and offline orders, manage tables, and update menus—all from one central hub. The software also works seamlessly with Caviar, Square’s fast-growing delivery service.

Square Appointments

Henry’s team extended this scheduling solution to allow hairstylists, photog­raphers, and other service providers who use Square’s payments platform to accept bookings directly through Instagram and Google.

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