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How Twitch is expanding beyond video games–and helping streamers make money

How Twitch is expanding beyond video games–and helping streamers make money
[Illustration: Artur Tenczyński]


Since joining Twitch, Amazon’s interactive streaming-video service, in January 2018, Sara Clemens has developed new audiences and revenue sources. Average concurrent viewers are up 35%, and minutes watched are up 42%, to more than 500 billion, thanks to what she calls “headline content” that demonstrates the platform’s potential beyond gaming. Clemens and her team partnered with The Washington Post, for example, to launch the show Playing Games With Politicians and stream congressional hearings. These efforts led to the French government choosing Twitch as the broadcaster for one of its 10-hour grand debates in February, as well as average Americans using the platform to stream coverage of the midterm elections and 2019 State of the Union. Clemens also organized movie and TV marathons, which helped persuade producers to create scripted live programs for Twitch, such as last summer’s sci-fi series Artificial Next. Earlier this year, under Clemens, Twitch debuted the Bounty Board, which lets parties that broadcast on Twitch earn money for using a product during a stream or playing a particular game for an hour. “They pick what’s authentic to them,” she says. Marketers such as Wendy’s, Universal Pictures, and Dollar Shave Club have run more than 150 Bounty Board campaigns in the program’s first few months.

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