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Watch NASA launch an Antares rocket and Cygnus cargo spacecraft into space

Watch NASA launch an Antares rocket and Cygnus cargo spacecraft into space
A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket carrying a Cygnus resupply spacecraft is seen during sunrise on Pad-0A, Tuesday, April 16, 2019 at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. [Photo: Bill Ingalls/NASA]

NASA is sending supplies to the astronauts living aboard the International Space Station and you can watch the Tang delivery lift-off.

The Northrop Grumman Antares rocket and Cygnus cargo spacecraft is set to take off from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia, on Wednesday, April 17, 4:46 p.m. ET. While SpaceX’s launches gets more attention, this will be Northrop Grumman’s eleventh contracted commercial resupply services mission for NASA. They will deliver 7,600 pounds of research, crew supplies, and hardware to the International Space Station.

Mission engineers load the final cargo into the Cygnus resupply spacecraft onboard the Northrop Grumman Antares rocket, Tuesday, April 16, 2019, at launch Pad-0A of NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Northrop Grumman’s 11th contracted cargo resupply mission with NASA to the International Space Station will deliver about 7,600 pounds of science and research, crew supplies and vehicle hardware to the orbital laboratory and its crew. [Photo: Bill Ingalls/NASA]
About two-and-a-half hours after launch, an automated command will initiate deployment of the spacecraft’s solar arrays. Full deployment will take approximately 30 minutes. The Cygnus spacecraft, dubbed the SS Roger Chaffee, will arrive at the space station Friday, April 19, at about 5:30 a.m. Once it is within range, NASA astronaut Anne McClain will grab the spacecraft using the station’s robotic arm.

After capture, ground controllers will command the station’s arm to rotate and install Cygnus on the bottom of the station to collect its precious cargo.

The experiments heading to the stars include the free-flying cubed robots AstrobeeSpace FibersVirginia Space ThinSat Program, and the all-important Rodent Research-12.

While we can’t watch the immune response of astronaut mice, we can watch the live stream of the lift-off via the embedded video below.

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