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This map of 50 cities where adults still live with their parents is super depressing

This map of 50 cities where adults still live with their parents is super depressing
[Image: courtesy of MagnifyMoney]

When I was first assigned to write this story, I thought it would be a funny look at all the grown-ass people who still live with their parents because it’s easier to have someone else buy your Hot Pockets and stock the proper number of towels. It’s pretty well known that this generation of young adults are more likely to live in a parent’s household, as data from Pew Research Center bears out.

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Researching the story, though, I discovered it’s actually a depressing sign of an economy where unemployment, underemployment, the lack of affordable child care, and an overall lack of money (hello, student loans!) is prohibiting young adults from simply moving out.

According to a new study from MagnifyMoney, Riverside, California, topped the of cities with young adults who are facing this problem, with 28% of people ages 25 to 40 living with their parents due to high unemployment rates in that population. High rent and lack of affordable housing are also factors. In Miami, Los Angeles, and New York, more than 1 in 4 residents ages 25 to 40 live in their parents’ homes.

On the other side of the spectrum, fewer than 12% of young adults live with their parents in Minneapolis. Seattle; Denver; Indianapolis; Kansas City, Missouri; and Raleigh, North Carolina, all fell right around the 12% mark

Men between the ages of 25 and 40 are more likely to live with their parents in every metro reviewed, except for Austin, Texas. There’s a good reason for that: The average unemployment rate for this age group across the 50 metros is 8.6%, which is more than twice the national unemployment rate of 4% as of January 2019. While some of the adults living with their parents are unemployed and actively looking for work, nearly 1 in 5 adults who live at home don’t participate in the labor market at all on average across the 50 metro areas. Adding together the unemployed and people who don’t participate in the labor force, only 72% of these adults are currently working while living with parents.

Another notable statistic to pull out of the research is that about 1 in 4 adults living with their parents have children of their own. Considering the well-established lack of affordable child care options, particularly for parents who don’t work a 9-to-5 schedule, living with parents can provide access to free babysitting.

So the next time someone tells you they live at home, try not to judge.

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