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Amazon slashes prices on hundreds of Whole Foods items

Amazon slashes prices on hundreds of Whole Foods items
[Photo: Flickr user Tyler Cipriani]

Whole Foods is fighting back against its nickname—”whole paycheck.” On Wednesday, the retailer announced that it’s slashing prices on hundreds of store items.

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This isn’t the first time the company adjusted price tags. Last November, Whole Foods also announced cuts and has since offered discounts and delivery perks to 100 million Amazon Prime members. (Amazon acquired the grocery chain in 2017.)

The latest cuts affect a number of aisles, but specifically produce, such as greens, tomatoes, and tropical fruits. Mangoes, for example, are now a $1 each, and organic bunched yellow chard will run you $1.99. Whole Foods says customers can expect average savings of roughly 20% on reduced products.

In addition, Prime members will now save “more than ever” with double the number of exclusive weekly Prime Member deals in addition to deeper discounts. In the following months, Whole Foods plans to release over 300 Prime member deals on some of their most popular seasonal items. This includes 35% off all Justin’s brand products, 40% off all Kite Hill plant-based products, and a 20% reduction for all prepared sandwiches and wraps.

Whole Foods say that since the Amazon acquisition, customers saved hundreds of millions of dollars through price cuts and Prime member deals. To entice even more subscribers, it announced a new sign-up special: Customers who try Prime will get $10 off their $20 purchase in-store. New members can try Prime free for 30 days.

“Every time a customer walks into a Whole Foods Market, they expect and trust industry-leading quality standards across aisles,” said Jeff Wilke, CEO of Amazon Worldwide Consumer, in a statement. “And now they will experience that same Whole Foods Market quality with even more savings across departments.”

Prices are the only ones cut of late. Earlier this month, Whole Foods employees reported that their shifts were dramatically cut following Amazon’s $15 minimum wage implementation last fall. A number of them said shift reductions affected workers across the board, particularly part-time workers, who reportedly saw hours reduced from 30 to 21 per week on average.

In a statement to Fast Company, Whole Foods refuted the workers’ claims, claiming their full-time team members averaged the same number of hours in January and February 2019 as they did during the same time last year. The company did not, however, address its part-time workers.

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