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Brandless expands into wellness with supplements, cleanses, and other Goop-style items

Brandless expands into wellness with supplements, cleanses, and other Goop-style items
[Photo: courtesy of Jen Siska]

Like many companies these days, Brandless is capitalizing on the $4.2 trillion wellness industry. On Wednesday, the e-commerce startup announced a new collection of affordable, Goop-like items.

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The 15 products cover a broad range of trendy categories. This includes “superfood” powders in flavors like organic matcha green tea powder ($9) and a seven-day “herbal cleanse kit” ($15) that claims to reset your gut. There are also four different essential oils ($5), organic gummy vitamins ($9), and supplements targeting a host of issues, such as better skin, hair, and nails.

[Photo: courtesy of Jen Siska]
Much like Warby Parker or Everlane, Brandless garnered a cult following by cutting out middleman markups on consumer packaged goods. It launched in 2017 with nonperishable food and other household items in an attempt to directly compete with Amazon.

The online retailer has since delved into a number of new categories, including pet care (frisbees, collars, and treats) and baby items (wipes, creams, lotion, and food). The company claims its products meet high standards using rigorous internal guidelines. For example, its clean beauty category is free of sulfates, dyes, parabens, formaldehyde, synthetic fragrances, and nearly 400 other potentially harmful ingredients.

Likewise, the wellness collection is organic, vegan, non-GMO, and gluten-free. Similar supplements have become increasingly popular with upscale retailers such as Sephora and Nordstrom, who sell competitors at often double or triple the price. Goop, for example, launched its own line of female-focused vitamins starting at $90 for a monthly pack.

“Wellness truly is for everybody, so we’ve made it easier to access high-quality products for less,” reads a press kit. “Our latest supplements, vitamins, and superfood powders are simple additions to modern life.”

The barely regulated supplement industry is worth $40 billion domestically. Brandless did not offer further details on the suppliers or manufacturers.

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