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We’re too damn exhausted to do anything about lack of sleep, survey finds

We’re too damn exhausted to do anything about lack of sleep, survey finds
[Photo: Ivan Obolensky/Pexels]

Everyone’s exhausted, and yet there’s little we’ll do to improve the situation.

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A new sleep survey found that 44% of global adults say their sleep worsened in the last five years, with 8 in 10 claiming they want to improve the situation. However, 60% never sought any medical or professional help for it, health technology company Philips discovered in its annual survey.

In fact, most people would rather just consult the internet for their drowsy issues.

The Philips global sleep survey also found that 76% of adults experience at least one listed condition that impacts their sleep, with insomnia (37%) and snoring (29%) topping the list.

For those who wish to get some shut-eye, several strategies stood out to researchers. Sixty-nine percent say they read at bedtime–the same percent who also watch TV to lull themselves to sleep. Listening to soothing music came in at 67%, while implementing a strict bedtime and wakeup time clocked in at 57%.

The survey comprised interviews with more than 11,006 respondents in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Japan, Netherlands, Singapore, South Korea, and the United States.

In the United Sates, roughly 70 million Americans suffer from chronic sleep problems and poor sleep health, reports the CDC. The national “sleep epidemic” affects the economy: 1.23 million days of U.S. work are lost each year due to chronic sleeplessness.

In the wake of such reports, the U.S. sleep aid market is expected to grow to over $100 billion by 2023. In the last few years, numerous tech startups have attempted to monitor and diagnose sleep issues by way of wearables, trackers, and even comfier PJs.

Beddit, which was acquired by Apple, sells a thin mattress sensor that analyzes a sleeper’s movements, snoring, and environment. The Oura ring measures pulse waveforms, heart rates, and body temperature. On the more experimental end, the Sleep Shepherd delivers brainwave sensors and beats to your ears, while Sleepion is a three-in-one palm-size gadget that emits sounds, lights, and sleep-inducing aromas.

“We have finally come to the age where people are interested in their health, more so than any other time in history,” sleep specialist Michael Breus previously told Fast Company. “It used to be all about exercise and diet, but sleep deprivation is entering the public vernacular.”

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