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These are the most popular jobs and companies for gen Z workers

Gen Z job seekers are in the early stages of their careers with part-time jobs, internships, or their first full-time role. Here’s where they’d most like to work and why.

These are the most popular jobs and companies for gen Z workers
[Photo: Jason Blackeye/Unsplash]

Not that we don’t care about millennials, but the growing crop of gen Z workers has employers taking notice. This cohort of young adult workers (the oldest are between 18-21) are entering a labor pool with record low unemployment. Glassdoor data suggests that they are primarily interested in high-paying jobs with an emphasis on technology.

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The most popular position gen Z workers are applying to over the course of the last three months is software engineer, with nearly one of five applications posted for this job. Coming in second is software developer, accounting for 2% of total applications. Sales associate, mechanical engineer, and data analyst round out the top five jobs gen-Zers most want to land.

Unsurprisingly, the top companies that are attracting gen Z talent are large tech firms, including IBM, Microsoft, Google, Amazon, and Salesforce (not noticeably different from their millennial counterparts who prioritized their bids to Amazon, IBM, Oracle, Google, and Apple. Gen-Zers also threw their hats in the ring at Deloitte, NBCUniversal, and Lockheed Martin.

Finally, after aggregating anonymous reviews on Glassdoor’s site, the highest-rated companies for gen Z workers were Apple, Google, and Microsoft with average ratings of 4.6 out of 5. Morgan Stanley came in fourth followed by Facebook, with an average rating of 4.5. What did they say? The most common points of praise from gen Z employees were “work environment,” “flexible hours,” and “good pay.”

Gen Z, they’re just like the rest of us working stiffs.

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About the author

Lydia Dishman is a reporter writing about the intersection of tech, leadership, and innovation. She is a regular contributor to Fast Company and has written for CBS Moneywatch, Fortune, The Guardian, Popular Science, and the New York Times, among others.

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