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Sad men are already trying to Last Jedi the audience score for Captain Marvel

If they tried really hard, they could probably find something better to do than obsess over how Rotten Tomatoes ranks women-centered blockbuster movies.

Sad men are already trying to Last Jedi the audience score for Captain Marvel
Brie Larson [Photo: courtesy of Marvel Studios]

Apparently, hell hath no fury like a fanboy scorned by a woman in his most beloved franchise.

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A little over a year ago, Star Wars: The Last Jedi suspiciously earned a Rotten Tomatoes audience score that was much lower than its critical rating (54% versus 92%). Although the website denied accusations of outside interference, the leader of a Facebook group called “Down With Disney’s Treatment of Franchises and its Fanboys” claimed credit for unleashing an army of bots to spam the site with takedowns of the film. Whether it was indeed the work of bots, or an organic backlash, many of the negative Rotten Tomatoes user reviews were from men unhappy with Star Wars centering on so many female characters.

Now it looks as though an assortment of sad men are directing a similar energy toward Captain Marvel.

As noted on Reddit, the forthcoming film’s Want to See score on Rotten Tomatoes, which later feeds into the site’s Audience Score, took a sharp recent dip from 99% to 81%. What’s responsible for the decline? A quick scan of comments from posters points to an abundance of men reacting to recent statements from Brie Larson.

Last week, the star announced that she preferred a more inclusive field of entertainment journo interviewing her around Captain Marvel, rather than the majority of white males she (reasonably) anticipates. This announcement soon made a lot of insecure men jump to the conclusion that Larson hates white guys, which in turn produced headlines like this one from the Daily Stormer: “Captain Marvel Chick Tells Her White Male Fans to Fuck Off.”

It seems unlikely that the campaign to lower Captain Marvel’s audience score will have any impact on how many people go see the film when it opens on March 8. What’s not surprising, though, is that those who were rubbed the wrong way by Larson’s announcement aren’t upset about the part of it that is legitimately concerning: Marie Claire‘s decision to let the star handpick a reporter to interview her. (That’s the editor’s job.) So, to recap, choosing one’s own interviewer, and thus controlling the tone of coverage, is fine, but being mean to white men is not. Got it.

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